Where humans, animals and robots meet

Swarm Tech

To meet our everyday needs in an increasingly multifaceted technological world is a challenge that pushes researchers to find innovative tools using a multidisciplinary approach. We inhabit a globalized planet, made up of complex systems, where domains such as communications, business, healthcare, energy or transportation converge, interact and integrate. Read More →

Picotechnology: Beyond Nano-Scale Engineering

picotech

While it’s become quite popular to discuss nanotechnology for a number of years now, picotechnology is the science of the future. This type of engineering is on a scale three orders of magnitude smaller than that which nanotechnology deals with. It’s actually considerably smaller than most chemistry measurements. Read More →

Nanopositioning and Image Stabilization

satellite-image

Nanotechnology has been discussed as one possible solution to image positioning problems that exist today. Recently a new nanopositioning device was introduced that’s far more affordable than previous models, and may provide an attractive alternative to engineers. This kind of technology has a number of OEM/research-related applications that are otherwise cost prohibitive today. Read More →

Ed-Tech and Research Economics

EdTech

A recent post on MindShift addressing the current state of educational technologies addressed the growing use of the freemium model within the sector. While many ed-tech applications are in theory “free”, the organizations behind them consider the data that users produce to be more valuable than traditional revenue streams. Users also open up countless connections and these connections are far more valuable than a few cents made downloading a piece of software. Read More →

Intro to External Pulsed Plasma Propulsion (EPPP)

Future Engine

External Pulsed Plasma Propulsion (EPPP)  is something that’s been discussed for some time. In fact, it was originally proposed by Stanislaw Ulam way back in 1947. Unfortunately the public perception of atomic technology as well as pieces of otherwise well meaning legislation have called into question the feasibility of spacecraft that operate using this advanced principle. Read More →

Advances in ‘Channeled Power’ are Accelerating

Image Source: WiTricity

Image Source: WiTricity

Something nearly every sci-fi series has in common: no wires or electrical outlets, and nobody seems to have any problem keeping a charge on their gadgets. While we’ve created better and better wireless technology here in the real world, we still can’t use it to power an entire house—let alone all of those starships we don’t have—and we still can’t charge our devices without being tethered to some kind of wire or dock. Read More →

Environmentally-Friendly Biolamp Concept

Basic RGB

Engineers typically consider the ability to transform pollution into fuel a holy grail of the applied sciences. A Hungarian engineer may have been able to do just that, however. Peter Horvath is attempting to market a device termed a biolamp that lights up the street while simultaneously removing carbon dioxide from the surrounding atmosphere. I think this is a really great idea if it can get off the ground. Read More →

One with the Cosmos: NASA App Review

NASA_App_02

Photo courtesy of NASA via Geek.com

The human collective interest of the final frontier has never reached such high levels today. With news of a successful Mars landing to open applications and marketing campaigns to become astronauts,  we feel like space is inching its way towards the palm of our hands. It may sound a little bit hypothetical, but in this age of smartphones and portable technology, it is very literal. Read More →

Nanodevices for a ‘More than Moore’ World

Nanotech

Moore’s Law – which holds that the number of transistors on an integrated circuit, and hence its processing power, doubles every 18 months – has been the guiding principle of chip design for almost half a century. But with physical limitations to further transistor scaling being reached, Moore’s Law may have met its match. We are entering a ‘More than Moore’ world in which EU-funded researchers are playing an important role. Read More →

Can DNA Template Lead to Future Technologies?

To the right is a honeycomb of graphene atoms. To the left is a double strand of DNA. The white spheres represent copper ions integral to the chemical assembly process. The fire represents the heat that is an essential ingredient in the technique. (Anatoliy Sokolov)

To the right is a honeycomb of graphene atoms. To the left is a double strand of DNA. The white spheres represent copper ions integral to the chemical assembly process. The fire represents the heat that is an essential ingredient in the technique. (Anatoliy Sokolov)

DNA is the blueprint for life. Could it also become the template for making a new generation of computer chips based not on silicon, but on an experimental material known as graphene? That’s the theory behind a process that Stanford chemical engineering professor Zhenan Bao reveals in Nature Communications (citation below). Bao and her co-authors, former post-doctoral fellows Anatoliy Sokolov and Fung Ling Yap, hope to solve a problem clouding the future of electronics: consumers expect silicon chips to continue getting smaller, faster and cheaper, but engineers fear that this virtuous cycle could grind to a halt. Read More →