Exploring STEM Subjects with the U.S. Navy

Jeff Walden, left, an engineer at Naval Surface Warfare Center, Corona Division, helps Bella Naso, a fifth grader at Riverside Christian Day School, pilot a remote-controlled drone during the 13th annual Science Technology Education Partnership conference.

Jeff Walden, left, an engineer at Naval Surface Warfare Center, Corona Division, helps Bella Naso, a fifth grader at Riverside Christian Day School, pilot a remote-controlled drone during the 13th annual Science Technology Education Partnership conference.

(BPT) – Pursuing a career in science, technology, engineering or math (STEM) subjects opens plenty of exciting and challenging opportunities for today’s students. Many of these opportunities exist in the Navy, including technically challenging missions that require intelligence and critical thinking. Read More →

Free App: STEM for Education

Americans made 80% of all scientific discoveries from the 1930s to the 1960s. The United States owes its status to its investment in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. Today, many countries are following suit by offering STEM education programs, improved infrastructure, numerous research opportunities, STEM scholarships, and active government support.

“The United States has been the dominant science superpower since the 1950s. As a result, in the early 1960s, the United States was spending seven times more money on scientific research than Europe,” said Carolina Cabral Murphy, Co-Founder of MicroEmpowering.

In the last three years, while still in the lead, the United States research output has only grown by 30 percent.

Mrs. Cabral Murphy also highlighted: “Investing in STEM education helps nations and individuals enjoy robust growth prospects.” Students completing STEM education programs enjoy:

  • More job opportunities
  • Better remuneration
  • Better growth prospects
  • Long-term stability in their careers

According to data analyzed by the U.S. Department of Commerce Economics and Statistics Administration, men and women enjoy a 50% STEM premium compared to the hourly wages of those working in non-STEM areas. Women suffer from a 21% wage gap in non-STEM jobs. This gap falls to 14% for women who have completed STEM programs, and the gap narrows drastically for women who have majored in computers, mathematics, or engineering.

Focusing on college education and offering STEM scholarships to college students will not suffice. Those who obtain STEM degrees typically start to show interest in science by age 11.  This means that interest in science and mathematics must be nurtured and encouraged during childhood.

With this challenge in mind MicroEmpowering.org launched an App called Curiosity School – STEM education series. The app is available for FREE @ the iTunes store:
http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/curiosity-school-stem-series/id521507118?mt=8

ABOUT MicroEmpowering:
MicroEmpowering.org provides community organizations, non-profit institutions, and social entrepreneurs with the technology, educational materials, and services they need.

Source: MicroEmpowering.org