The Future of Molecular Electronics

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The emerging field of molecular electronics could take our definition of portable to the next level, enabling the construction of tiny circuits from molecular components. In these highly efficient devices, individual molecules would take on the roles currently played by comparatively-bulky wires, resistors and transistors. Read More →

Using Insects to Advance Cybernetics

Credit: UNIST/American Chemical Society

Credit: UNIST/American Chemical Society

While a majority of the attention on cybernetic technology has been paid to human test subjects, more researchers are now looking into what the interface between animals and machinery might soon look like. Graphene and carbon nanotubes have been melded together into a single mesh that works on a monolithic architecture. This flexible electronic device can then actually interface with living things. Read More →

Nanodevices for a ‘More than Moore’ World

Nanotech

Moore’s Law – which holds that the number of transistors on an integrated circuit, and hence its processing power, doubles every 18 months – has been the guiding principle of chip design for almost half a century. But with physical limitations to further transistor scaling being reached, Moore’s Law may have met its match. We are entering a ‘More than Moore’ world in which EU-funded researchers are playing an important role. Read More →

First Ever Chemical Circuit

Klas Tybrandt, doctoral student in organic electronics at Linköping University, Sweden, has developed an integrated chemical chip. The results have just been published in the prestigious journal Nature Communications (cited below). Read More →

The Merging of Biology and Electronics [Research]

The boundary between electronics and biology is blurring with the first detection by researchers at Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory of ferroelectric properties in an amino acid called glycine.

A multi-institutional research team led by Andrei Kholkin of the University of Aveiro, Portugal, used a combination of experiments and modeling to identify and explain the presence of ferroelectricity, a property where materials switch their polarization when an electric field is applied, in the simplest known amino acid—glycine (referenced below). Read More →