Nanopositioning and Image Stabilization

satellite-image

Nanotechnology has been discussed as one possible solution to image positioning problems that exist today. Recently a new nanopositioning device was introduced that’s far more affordable than previous models, and may provide an attractive alternative to engineers. This kind of technology has a number of OEM/research-related applications that are otherwise cost prohibitive today. Read More →

Ed-Tech and Research Economics

EdTech

A recent post on MindShift addressing the current state of educational technologies addressed the growing use of the freemium model within the sector. While many ed-tech applications are in theory “free”, the organizations behind them consider the data that users produce to be more valuable than traditional revenue streams. Users also open up countless connections and these connections are far more valuable than a few cents made downloading a piece of software. Read More →

Intro to External Pulsed Plasma Propulsion (EPPP)

Future Engine

External Pulsed Plasma Propulsion (EPPP)  is something that’s been discussed for some time. In fact, it was originally proposed by Stanislaw Ulam way back in 1947. Unfortunately the public perception of atomic technology as well as pieces of otherwise well meaning legislation have called into question the feasibility of spacecraft that operate using this advanced principle. Read More →

Exploring the Future of Wind Power in the U.S.

Image Credit: GE Energy

Image Credit: GE Energy

Wind power is currently the fastest growing source of energy worldwide. In the United States, the industry expanded by as much as 50% a year between 2000 and 2010, according to the Department of Energy (DOE). During that decade, federal tax breaks and state initiatives facilitated the construction of hundreds of turbine farms around the country. Several regions of the United States in particular have aggressively developed wind harvesting industries. Rockport, Missouri, for example, was the first American community to receive the majority of its energy from wind in 2008. Several other states currently lead the implementation of wind harvesting – California, Oregon, Washington, Illinois, Iowa, and Minnesota. Texas, however, leads all of the states in wind power initiatives, generating one-fourth of the nation’s wind energy with 10,000 megawatts of wind capacity.  Read More →

Brain Model Pins Down Motor Decisions

Image Credit: University of Nottingham

Image Credit: University of Nottingham

Talking or reading. Texting a message or listening. The dilemma of choosing between various tasks is not an invention of the modern information age. Humans and all vertebrates have to prioritize their actions. But to understand the neurobiology of how these decisions are made is a challenging scientific problem. Now, the EU-funded project Select-and-Act, completed in 2012, has provided further insight into the problem. Read More →

Good vibrations: Using light-heated water to deliver drugs

Schematic representation of NIR-induced release mechanism: (A) Absorption spectrum of water in the NIR region; (B) Formation of isolated nano-domains of water in the polymeric structure; (C) Release of encapsulated molecules following photothermal heating of water droplets inside the polymer particles.

Schematic representation of NIR-induced release mechanism: (A) Absorption spectrum of water in the NIR region; (B) Formation of isolated nano-domains of water in the polymeric structure; (C) Release of encapsulated molecules following photothermal heating of water droplets inside the polymer particles.

Researchers from the University of California, San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, in collaboration with materials scientists, engineers and neurobiologists, have discovered a new mechanism for using light to activate drug-delivering nanoparticles and other targeted therapeutic substances inside the body. Read More →

Advances in ‘Channeled Power’ are Accelerating

Image Source: WiTricity

Image Source: WiTricity

Something nearly every sci-fi series has in common: no wires or electrical outlets, and nobody seems to have any problem keeping a charge on their gadgets. While we’ve created better and better wireless technology here in the real world, we still can’t use it to power an entire house—let alone all of those starships we don’t have—and we still can’t charge our devices without being tethered to some kind of wire or dock. Read More →

Computing with Slime

Slime_Mold

A future computer might be a lot slimier than the solid silicon devices we have today. In a study published in the journal Materials Today, European researchers reveal details of logic units built using living slime molds, which might act as the building blocks for computing devices and sensors (citation below). Read More →

The Future of Computers and Artificial Intelligence

ai-image

In the last 50 years, the advent of computers has radically altered our daily routines and habits. From huge, roomy, terribly expensive and rather useless machines, computers have managed to become quite the opposite of all the above, seeing an exponential growth in the number of units sold and, stunningly, usability as well. Read More →

Robots in the Workplace

Robot031314

Small, mobile robots will learn to take over the tasks in the automotive industry that have not yet been possible to automate. This challenge is part of a 47 million kroner EU funded research project aimed at making robots available to small and medium-sized companies without the need of robotics expertise. Read More →