Nanoparticles In Rodents

Image Credit: Edward A. Sykes & Qin Dai

Image Credit: Edward A. Sykes & Qin Dai

When many people find stories reporting scientific research in animals, they typically assume that the content will somehow involve some aspect of genetic modification. Typically this is true, and generally these modifications are accompanied by heated ethical debates. Canadian researchers, however, have been looking into a completely different and promising technology that I thought I’d share with you today. Read More →

Picotechnology: Beyond Nano-Scale Engineering

picotech

While it’s become quite popular to discuss nanotechnology for a number of years now, picotechnology is the science of the future. This type of engineering is on a scale three orders of magnitude smaller than that which nanotechnology deals with. It’s actually considerably smaller than most chemistry measurements. Read More →

Nanopositioning and Image Stabilization

satellite-image

Nanotechnology has been discussed as one possible solution to image positioning problems that exist today. Recently a new nanopositioning device was introduced that’s far more affordable than previous models, and may provide an attractive alternative to engineers. This kind of technology has a number of OEM/research-related applications that are otherwise cost prohibitive today. Read More →

Good vibrations: Using light-heated water to deliver drugs

Schematic representation of NIR-induced release mechanism: (A) Absorption spectrum of water in the NIR region; (B) Formation of isolated nano-domains of water in the polymeric structure; (C) Release of encapsulated molecules following photothermal heating of water droplets inside the polymer particles.

Schematic representation of NIR-induced release mechanism: (A) Absorption spectrum of water in the NIR region; (B) Formation of isolated nano-domains of water in the polymeric structure; (C) Release of encapsulated molecules following photothermal heating of water droplets inside the polymer particles.

Researchers from the University of California, San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, in collaboration with materials scientists, engineers and neurobiologists, have discovered a new mechanism for using light to activate drug-delivering nanoparticles and other targeted therapeutic substances inside the body. Read More →

Computing with Slime

Slime_Mold

A future computer might be a lot slimier than the solid silicon devices we have today. In a study published in the journal Materials Today, European researchers reveal details of logic units built using living slime molds, which might act as the building blocks for computing devices and sensors (citation below). Read More →

Defective Nanotubes Turned into Light Emitters

A diagram of the device proposed by the UPV/EHU’s NanoBio Spectroscopy Group. The result has led to the patent for a new source of light emission; its main feature is that it emits across the whole of the visible and ultraviolet spectrum at ambient temperature, and can be produced using standard manufacturing methods.

A diagram of the device proposed by the UPV/EHU’s NanoBio Spectroscopy Group. The result has led to the patent for a new source of light emission; its main feature is that it emits across the whole of the visible and ultraviolet spectrum at ambient temperature, and can be produced using standard manufacturing methods.

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Nanodevices for a ‘More than Moore’ World

Nanotech

Moore’s Law – which holds that the number of transistors on an integrated circuit, and hence its processing power, doubles every 18 months – has been the guiding principle of chip design for almost half a century. But with physical limitations to further transistor scaling being reached, Moore’s Law may have met its match. We are entering a ‘More than Moore’ world in which EU-funded researchers are playing an important role. Read More →

Jacking into Cyberspace via Intracranial Nanowires

Neural Pathway

With the production of portable digital computers at an all-time high, intracranial nanowires are looking like a realistic emerging technology. Since the cortical plasticity of the brain is so high, the brain can accept neuroprosthetic devices as though they were natural sensors. An uncomfortable adaptation period might come with the implant, but after a patient works through this they should be otherwise fine. Read More →

Molecular Machines for Nanotech Applications

Two different assembly stages (purple and red) of the protein ubiquitin and the fluorescent probe used to visualize these stage (tryptophan: see yellow).

Enabling bioengineers to design new molecular machines for nanotechnology applications is one of the possible outcomes of a study by University of Montreal researchers that was published in Nature Structural and Molecular Biology yesterday (cited below). The scientists have developed a new approach to visualize how proteins assemble, which may also significantly aid our understanding of diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, which are caused by errors in assembly. Read More →

Finding Nanoscale Defects in Memory Devices

The future of space travel, artificial intelligence, and AI are dependent upon our ability to store massive amounts of data in really small areas. It’s a complex undertaking to say the least. Fortunately, new research indicates that we may get there a bit faster by enabling engineers to discover defects that lead to memory problems much more accurately than was previously possible.  Read More →