Ed-Tech and Research Economics

EdTech

A recent post on MindShift addressing the current state of educational technologies addressed the growing use of the freemium model within the sector. While many ed-tech applications are in theory “free”, the organizations behind them consider the data that users produce to be more valuable than traditional revenue streams. Users also open up countless connections and these connections are far more valuable than a few cents made downloading a piece of software. Read More →

Olympic Hopefuls Go for Gold with Virtual School

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(BPT) – Thirteen year-old Vincent Zhou is the 2013 U.S. Figure Skating Junior Men’s National Champion. He dreams of one day representing the United States in the Olympics. Zhou, of Southern California, is a ninth-grader at Capistrano Connections Academy, where, despite his rigorous training schedule, he also excels off the ice, earning straight A’s in all subject areas and earning the Presidential Award for Educational Excellence. Read More →

Global Science R&D Expenditures [Infographic]

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Source: Super Scholoar

One with the Cosmos: NASA App Review

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Photo courtesy of NASA via Geek.com

The human collective interest of the final frontier has never reached such high levels today. With news of a successful Mars landing to open applications and marketing campaigns to become astronauts,  we feel like space is inching its way towards the palm of our hands. It may sound a little bit hypothetical, but in this age of smartphones and portable technology, it is very literal. Read More →

Food for Thought: Paradoxes of Self-Reference

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Our English language, like all human languages, is full of surprises. One such is Grelling’s Paradox, named after the German logician Kurt Grelling (1886-1942). It begins with the innocuous observation that some English adjectives apply to themselves. Read More →

Collaborating to Improve Student Behavior

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Today, ClassDojo, a free behavior management platform for teachers, students and parents, is launching a ‘Class Sharing’ feature: the ability for teachers to share their classes with other teachers at their school. This enables teachers to collaborate in order to build positive behaviors and character strengths with their students across classrooms, throughout the school day. This is a positive step towards helping teachers break down the walls separating their classes, and providing them an easier way to consistently improve behavior with students as they move through classes during the school day. Read More →

Epistemology: Defining the Concept of Learning

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Epistemology is the study of how humans acquire knowledge.  Human learning is best defined as a relatively permanent modification of behavior that comes about as the result of experience. Read More →

Exploring STEM Subjects with the U.S. Navy

Jeff Walden, left, an engineer at Naval Surface Warfare Center, Corona Division, helps Bella Naso, a fifth grader at Riverside Christian Day School, pilot a remote-controlled drone during the 13th annual Science Technology Education Partnership conference.

Jeff Walden, left, an engineer at Naval Surface Warfare Center, Corona Division, helps Bella Naso, a fifth grader at Riverside Christian Day School, pilot a remote-controlled drone during the 13th annual Science Technology Education Partnership conference.

(BPT) – Pursuing a career in science, technology, engineering or math (STEM) subjects opens plenty of exciting and challenging opportunities for today’s students. Many of these opportunities exist in the Navy, including technically challenging missions that require intelligence and critical thinking. Read More →

Challenge Your Online Learning Expectations

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By: Kathryn Landers

It’s the middle of the night. You sit alone, confused with only the cold, harsh light from your email lighting the room. Are you ever going to hear from your online college? Read More →

Why America Desperately Needs More Scientists & Engineers

STEM Careers

Studies have shown that the number of jobs available in the United States is directly related to advances made in science and engineering.  Education experts feel that if America has few leaders developing the technological advances that will create the jobs of the future, then the future will hold few opportunities for our young workers. Read More →