Collaborating to Improve Student Behavior

ClassDojo share notification

Today, ClassDojo, a free behavior management platform for teachers, students and parents, is launching a ‘Class Sharing’ feature: the ability for teachers to share their classes with other teachers at their school. This enables teachers to collaborate in order to build positive behaviors and character strengths with their students across classrooms, throughout the school day. This is a positive step towards helping teachers break down the walls separating their classes, and providing them an easier way to consistently improve behavior with students as they move through classes during the school day.

The company is offering a limited number of ‘early-access’ slots, which teachers can get here: http://goo.gl/UGxcGE

ClassDojo class tile

ClassDojo’s ‘Class Sharing’ feature delivers on a popular teacher request: collaboration with other teachers across classrooms. ClassDojo was initially designed to allow a teacher to build positive behaviors in a single classroom; the team then discovered that teachers also wanted to work together on improving their students’ behavior. With this newest feature, several teachers in one school can now collaborate around a group of students to deliver consistent experiences that emphasize building positive behaviors and character strengths such as participation, hard work, persistence, curiosity, risk-taking, and helping others. Teachers can also let other teachers provide feedback to their students by giving them ‘full access’ to the class; alternatively they can provide each other ‘view only’ access if they simply want to share progress reports.

“Real-time reinforcement of positive behavior, especially when provided consistently by all the people who care about a student, influences future behavior and makes a lasting impact on a child’s development,” says Sam Chaudhary, a former teacher and co-founder of ClassDojo. “We’ve seen tremendous results as a stand alone teacher tool, and are excited to add to that success with increased collaboration across whole schools. When a student leaves a classroom, it’s not just that teacher who cares about their development, there are other teachers, administrators, and parents who want to be involved. We’re trying to bring all of these people together.”

“Our first step into more ‘whole school’ features is an exciting development that directly answers our users’ top request,” says Kalen Gallagher, another former teacher and ClassDojo’s first employee. “Teachers are excited about breaking down the walls between their classes and having yet another way to use ClassDojo to build positive learning habits with their students”

Check out ClassDojo here: http://www.classdojo.com

Post Navigation