Mind Over Evolution: An Alternative Vision of Humanity

consciousness

Part of the reason why fierce debates rage around the origins of man – in the conflicts between Creationism and Darwinism that we see within many schools, for example – is because our beliefs about where we came from can strongly influence our sense of identity and our feelings of self-worth. It’s impossible to separate our self-image from our life philosophies in that regard. The stories we cling to will paint our inner pictures of who we are, where we come from and what our race can achieve.

Unfortunately, the stories that we’ve inherited in our culture paint a fairly unflattering picture that does little to inspire us to discover and express our true potential in this world.

Science spins its own version of reality. If you believe that the sky is blue because of the chemical composition of the gases that exist up there, and the way that light refracts off of them, then that’s all you’ll ever see. You won’t perceive the unfathomable mystery of it all. What is the true nature of light, or gases, or the color blue? Questions like these are beyond our ken. The theory of evolution teaches us that it’s useless to ask such questions anyhow, though. This theory, which forms the backbone of so much scientific thought and of our very definitions of humanity, maintains that matter came first and consciousness emerged later – almost as an afterthought; and certainly by accident.

consciousness (1)What if the mind formed matter? What if consciousness preceded everything else, and created form? Our scientific indoctrination has convinced us that reality works the other way around, but we’ve been offered little actual proof of this. What is obvious, however, is that the belief that consciousness always comes first would do much more to uphold the beauty, grace and potential of our natures than does the belief that our existence was the random result of accidental evolution.

We would do well to adopt stories that inspire us and offer us a new vision of what humanity can aspire to. When trying to grasp the nature of our reality as human beings, and drawing upon the resources that civilization offers us, we’ve thus far been essentially left with a choice between atonement (the predominant religious thinking of the West), accepting that the world we exist in is illusory (the predominant religious thinking of the East), or the theory of evolution. Typically, we are never taught or encouraged to believe that we are, ourselves, divine.

None of the arguments that uphold a notion of a barren and sterile universe can hold water. Most children know better than to believe in those wet-blanket descriptions of reality. Sadly, though, they eventually learn to accept them. How could they not, when our cultural beliefs make their survival virtually dependent upon it?

Love has to come from somewhere. But within the world’s established religions, love always has its conditions; and within the world of science, love can be explained away in terms of neurological transmissions and chemical interactions. It seems that our race, by and large, is willing to accept practically any belief except for one that maintains that what we are is something miraculous.

Most scientists or religious scholars would dispute that we are miraculous, by virtue of being conscious beings. Could it be that consciousness came first; that we did not become humans by accident? What if consciousness created our world in order to express all that it is, and to become better acquainted with itself? If this is true, how might it change the idea that consciousness will arise in machines once we’ve reverse-engineered the brain?

  • http://twitter.com/jason_d_carr/status/288987733454647296/ Jason Carr (@jason_d_carr)

    Mind Over Evolution: An Alternative Vision of Humanity http://t.co/Gkina2h0

  • http://aquilakahecate.blogspot.com/ Aquila Ka Hecate

    I have no doubt whatsoever that this is true, Jason.
    I cannot, however, prove it in any terms acceptable by our present culture. :)

    • Jason Carr

      Hi Aquila thanks for the comment. It’s funny that you say that because I was thinking as I was writing it that there’s simply no way this hypothesis could ever be tested. :(

  • http://twitter.com/AquilakaHecate/status/289014568762630144/ @AquilakaHecate

    “What if consciousness created our world in order to express all that it is..?” @jason_d_carr http://t.co/h874VCUo

  • Esus

    Like all philosophical questions, you can suppose all you like but objectively testing is impossible. Sounds like the age old question of materialism vs idealism. I find with materialism I can at least know some things whereas with idealism I might as well believe in a god or a tea pot floating around in space that we can’t see… or a consciousness realizing itself. It does nothing to answer any of the questions I would like answered.

    • Jason Carr

      Agree 100% Esus. I’m a firm believer that if something can’t be tested, from a scientific standpoint it has no validity. This is something I struggle with frequently because I do like to think about these types of philosophical questions.

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