Chandra Discovers the Fastest Wind From a Stellar-Mass Black Hole

Making use of NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers recently announced that they have recorded the quickest wind ever recorded coming off of a stellar-mass black hole. This discovery has important implications for how exactly these type of black holes work.

This record-breaking wind was found to be moving at about 20 million mph, which is about three percent of the speed of light. This is about ten times as fast as astronomers have ever witnessed coming off of a stellar-mass black hole.

Stellar-mass black holes, such as this one, become formed when large stars reach their end and collapse. They have an approximate mass of five to ten times that of our sun. The stellar-mass black hole that produced these particular winds was IGR J17091-3624. These winds are the equivalent of a cosmic category five hurricane, which took astronomers by surprise to see such powerful winds coming from a stellar-mass black hole such as this one. This black hole is relatively small compared to some of the other black holes astronomers have discovered, yet it has produced winds that far exceed that of the larger black holes.

Unlike winds found on Earth, the winds found in the black hole blow in various directions rather then in a single direction. This would send you on quite a ride!

Image Credit: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss

Reference: http://astronomy.com/News-Observing/News/2012/02/Chandra finds fastest wind from stellar-mass black hole.aspx

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